Posts Tagged ‘Windows’

Microsoft Corp is conceiving the idea to allow Android apps on Windows given that the Android has become such a success in a short span of time. The company is split in taking the step, though. One segment of Microsoft anticipates that the company should allow Android apps to run inside its platforms to fill the app deficit. The other segment thinks that it will not be a wise choice for the company and will lead to the end of Windows.

As per reports from The Verge, running Android apps on Windows means that Microsoft will allow Android apps on Windows and Windows Phone platforms. The negotiations are still on over the topic and are said to be in their early stages at Microsoft Corp. The Windows maker’s new CEO Satya Nadella is likely to take a call over the matter soon.

If Microsoft heads with this idea, the company may use a virtualisation layer like Bluestacks’ solution to run Android applications on Windows and will provide the apps through its own customised store. Apps like Temple Run in Android version run on Windows 8 using BlueStacks.

No details are available as of now, since Microsoft is yet to make a choice. Microsoft is reportedly keeping a close eye on the performance of Nokia’s new Android smartphone that may be launched at the Mobile World Congress, this month. The performance of the new smartphone is likely to be a deciding factor for Microsoft to take this call.

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This blog has been moved. Please click to open the post in blog.rambabusaravanan.com

This blog has been moved. Please click to open the post in blog.rambabusaravanan.com

Android Powered Devices have virtual machine in which apps run is one of the huge advantage. Android has been using Dalvik Virtual Machine which make use of JIT (Just-In-Time) Compiler since first version of it. Now it is the decision by Google to include a new runtime in Android 4.4 KitKat known as Android RunTime (ART) which make use of Ahead-Of-Time (AOT) Compilation that promises to make your device faster and your battery last longer ..

Android Virtual Machine : Dalvik vs ART

Android Virtual Machine : Dalvik vs ART

Before we jump into this brand new VM, and why it’s turned off by default, let’s make sure everyone understands what we’re talking about ..

Virtual Machine

Virtual Machines are not physical machines but as a software makes possible to run other machines in a your physical machine. For example consider you having a Windows Machine (Assume as it is the only physical machine you are having with you) and if you want to use a Linux or a Mac System, then Virtual Machine paves the way to running a Linux machine or Mac Machine in your Windows Machine ..

Advantages

One of the advantages is the physical separation of each environment in which all the apps (including viruses, malware, and even crashed apps) are all kept apart from your main OS ..

And the next thing is the ability to run programs written for one architecture on a box that runs something different. For example, the ability to run programs compiled to run on an ARM-based CPU when your computer is running an Intel-based processor ..

Android and VM

In order to target different many devices like Tablet, Smartphones, PC, TV, Watch and other gadgets running Android on different hardware architecture, Android uses a specialized virtual machine to run their apps ..

The concept lies here. Developers write code and we download those from the Play Store or some other source. This code is mostly uncompiled. When you use those, it gets comipled to target(in otherwords ‘according to’) the type of device we are having ..

Dalvik (JIT Compilation)

Usually Android uses Dalvik Virtual Machine to compile and run. The concept of Dalvik lies here. Dalvik VM uses JIT (Just-In-Time) Comiplation, which means the downloaded and installed app remains uncompiled untill it’s first launch. And when it is launched first time, it gets compiled just in that time and loaded into RAM (main memory) and hence the name Just-In-Time Compilation. This whole process repeats again when the app/os gets restarted ..

ART (AOT Compilation)

Now Android 4.4 KitKat includes a new runtime call “Android runtime”, ART. Unlike JIT, which must compile every app everytime whenever it’s loaded, ART works on a concept called ahead-of-time (AOT) compilation. The Concept lies here. When you download and install an app it automatically pre-compiles. This takes up more space on your device and takes longer to initially install when compared to Dalvik. However, apps launch quicker and are arguably faster when run using ART rather than Dalvik. What’s more, since less time is required to run apps, your processor doesn’t get worked as hard and your battery life may benefit as a result ..

ART is not set Default

ART is currently very experimental. Not every app works properly in ART, and if you already installed all your apps under Dalvik, you’ll need to reboot and wait up to 20 minutes (less if you have fewer apps, more if you’ve got a bunch) for that first boot to complete. You see, it’s got to pre-compile all of them so they’re ready for you. For all of those reasons, ART is disabled by default ..

Benefits

As based on reports from various sources, it is approximated as follows

  1. 50% – 100% increase in speed
  2. 25% increase in battery life

AOT compilation is the future, and ART is the way Google is going to get us there. This is just the first little step toward a much more lofty goal. Perhaps ART will be the standard runtime in Android 5.0 ..

For further more information visit here ..

 

Considering that Steve Ballmer has been chief executive of Microsoft for more than a decade, it might sound strange to say this. But the sweeping reorganization announced Wednesday made it clear that Microsoft is now his company.

But in the various memos and news releases, the company emphasized that while Windows remains crucial to its future, it’s no longer the way Microsoft wants to define itself. The company is now about “devices and services,” Ballmer said in a memo.

“Ballmer has definitely placed his stamp on Microsoft, meaning the ‘Gates era’ has come to an end,” said Patrick Moorhead of Moor Insights & Strategy. “He is fundamentally shifting the company from an operating system company to services and devices company. In a world where operating systems are free, as in the case of Android, iOS and Linux, Windows is a lot less important.”

To accelerate that shift, Microsoft is collapsing the number of divisions from eight to four. Ballmer wants to promote more collaboration at a company often seen as internally fractious.

It’s a radical push to remake the company. But there’s no arguing that the reorganization is the capstone to one of the most remarkable years of transformation we’ve seen at a technology giant.

Under Ballmer, Microsoft has engaged in a historic upheaval of nearly every part of its massive product line.

Much of that has been documented in bits and pieces. The biggest news was the redesign that came with Windows 8. But there’s also the launch of Outlook.com, the new Windows Phones, the new Xbox One coming later this year, a new cloud-based version of Office.com. And the list goes on.

And, of course, there’s been the push to build its own tablet, the Surface. In the announcement, Ballmer promised to continue working with third parties as it has traditionally done, but also to keep looking for ways to build more of its own devices.

Many of these moves have come in for heavy criticism. Sales of the Surface have not been stellar. Windows 8 has failed to stem a steep decline in PC sales.

But from the point of view of the new Microsoft, all this matters less than you think. With the new guiding philosophy, Windows is not the sole benchmark by which to measure its success or failures. Rather, the company wants to be given credit for the enormous breadth of things it does for both consumers and enterprise, and how well all of those things work together.

Indeed, while some of the consumer offerings have failed to catch fire so far, the enterprise side of Microsoft has been growing quite nicely in recent months.

So much so, that investors seem, at least for the moment, to be optimistic that this new, post-Windows Microsoft, has a fighting chance. The stock in mid-day trading Wednesday was up $0.67 or 1.93% to $35.37. The stock has been on a decent run this year, up more than 24% and coming close to the $36 per share mark it last reached in 2007.

Of course, for all the major surgery at Microsoft, it remains to be seen whether this will translate into a company that can grow at the pace investors want over the long term. Or whether it can regain any sense of leadership in the fast-moving worlds of mobile and cloud technologies, where so far the company has been outflanked by rivals such as Apple and Google.

Ballmer’s legacy is now firmly tied to these remarkable changes. Whether he’s remembered as a transformative corporate visionary or a bumbling, misguided chief executive will depend more on what happens in his second decade running the company than his first.