Posts Tagged ‘tablet’

This blog has been moved. Please click to open the post in blog.rambabusaravanan.com

This blog has been moved. Please click to open the post in blog.rambabusaravanan.com

Android Powered Devices have virtual machine in which apps run is one of the huge advantage. Android has been using Dalvik Virtual Machine which make use of JIT (Just-In-Time) Compiler since first version of it. Now it is the decision by Google to include a new runtime in Android 4.4 KitKat known as Android RunTime (ART) which make use of Ahead-Of-Time (AOT) Compilation that promises to make your device faster and your battery last longer ..

Android Virtual Machine : Dalvik vs ART

Android Virtual Machine : Dalvik vs ART

Before we jump into this brand new VM, and why it’s turned off by default, let’s make sure everyone understands what we’re talking about ..

Virtual Machine

Virtual Machines are not physical machines but as a software makes possible to run other machines in a your physical machine. For example consider you having a Windows Machine (Assume as it is the only physical machine you are having with you) and if you want to use a Linux or a Mac System, then Virtual Machine paves the way to running a Linux machine or Mac Machine in your Windows Machine ..

Advantages

One of the advantages is the physical separation of each environment in which all the apps (including viruses, malware, and even crashed apps) are all kept apart from your main OS ..

And the next thing is the ability to run programs written for one architecture on a box that runs something different. For example, the ability to run programs compiled to run on an ARM-based CPU when your computer is running an Intel-based processor ..

Android and VM

In order to target different many devices like Tablet, Smartphones, PC, TV, Watch and other gadgets running Android on different hardware architecture, Android uses a specialized virtual machine to run their apps ..

The concept lies here. Developers write code and we download those from the Play Store or some other source. This code is mostly uncompiled. When you use those, it gets comipled to target(in otherwords ‘according to’) the type of device we are having ..

Dalvik (JIT Compilation)

Usually Android uses Dalvik Virtual Machine to compile and run. The concept of Dalvik lies here. Dalvik VM uses JIT (Just-In-Time) Comiplation, which means the downloaded and installed app remains uncompiled untill it’s first launch. And when it is launched first time, it gets compiled just in that time and loaded into RAM (main memory) and hence the name Just-In-Time Compilation. This whole process repeats again when the app/os gets restarted ..

ART (AOT Compilation)

Now Android 4.4 KitKat includes a new runtime call “Android runtime”, ART. Unlike JIT, which must compile every app everytime whenever it’s loaded, ART works on a concept called ahead-of-time (AOT) compilation. The Concept lies here. When you download and install an app it automatically pre-compiles. This takes up more space on your device and takes longer to initially install when compared to Dalvik. However, apps launch quicker and are arguably faster when run using ART rather than Dalvik. What’s more, since less time is required to run apps, your processor doesn’t get worked as hard and your battery life may benefit as a result ..

ART is not set Default

ART is currently very experimental. Not every app works properly in ART, and if you already installed all your apps under Dalvik, you’ll need to reboot and wait up to 20 minutes (less if you have fewer apps, more if you’ve got a bunch) for that first boot to complete. You see, it’s got to pre-compile all of them so they’re ready for you. For all of those reasons, ART is disabled by default ..

Benefits

As based on reports from various sources, it is approximated as follows

  1. 50% – 100% increase in speed
  2. 25% increase in battery life

AOT compilation is the future, and ART is the way Google is going to get us there. This is just the first little step toward a much more lofty goal. Perhaps ART will be the standard runtime in Android 5.0 ..

For further more information visit here ..

Apple took design cuesits smaller iPad mini and made the larger format tablet thinner and lighter, renaming it iPad Air. It also revamped the iPad mini with Retina display.

The new iPads have a number of small internal improvements which were seen in the recently launched iPhone 5S.

At an event in California US, on Tuesday, the company launched its new crop of products, including the two new iPads and Macbook Pro laptops, while also announcing the availability of its latest operating system OSX Mavericks as a free download.

The latest iPad Air and the new iPad mini with much-awaited Retina display come at a time when the Cupertino-based iPhone and iPad maker is facing a growing challengethe Google Android-based tabletsmanufacturersSamsung, LG and Asus.

However, given the pricing of the iPads, it is obvious Apple does not want to compete in non-premium tablet category as it does in the smartphone business with iPhones.

iPad Air is 20% thinner, 28% lighter and has 43% smaller bezels than last year’s iPad 4, which has curiously been stopped by Apple even as it will continue to sell the earlier generation iPads. The 9.7 inch iPad Air with Retina display resembles iPad mini a lot. It is 7.5mm thick and weighs 1 pound. Apple claimed it is the thinnest full-sized tablet in the world.

iPad Air uses the same 64-bit A7 chip and the M7 motion co-processor that was introduced recently with the iPhone 5S. It can open files and render graphics twice as fast as the iPad 4, while still promising the same 10-hour battery life.

The new model will hit the shelves on November 1 and come in Space Grey and Silver colours. It will be available at $499, $599, $699 and $799 for the 16GB, 32GB, 64GB and 128GB Wi-Fi models respectively. The Wi-Fi and 4G models will cost another $130 over and above that in case of each model.

iPad Air comes with a disappointing 5MP rear iSight camera, but a 1.2MP front-facing HD camera for FaceTime with improved backside illumination sensors features larger pixels for better low-light performance. It is powered by iOS 7, which is the latest version of the software and brings featuresrevamped search, notifications, control centre and the iCloud Keychain password manager.

Curiously, while Apple phased out last year’s iPad 4its portfolio, it has retained in its lineup the iPad 2, which was launched two years ago. The fourth-generation iPad was launched last October.

Apple also unveiled the new iPad mini with Retina display which was much-awaited. The Retina iPad mini has twice the screen resolution than the first model at 2048x1536p in the same 7.9-inch display. It also runs on the 64-bit A7 chipset, a huge upgrade over the A5 chip used in the previous version. The new iPad mini too will be launched in November and come in Silver and Space Grey colours.

The mini-tablet also runs iOS 7 and comes with the same 5MP iSight and 1.2MP front camera for FaceTime. The Retina iPad mini will cost $399 for the 16GB Wi-Fi model and $529 for 16GB Wi-Fi and 4G variant. The 32GB, 64GB and 128GB Wi-Fi models have been priced at $499, $599 and $699, while their respective Wi-Fi and cellular variants cost another $130 over and above for each model.

The company has also retained the iPad mini launched last year, but cut its price by $30,$329 to $299. Apple also showcased two covers for the iPad Air and Retina iPad mini priced at $69 and $79, respectively.

Both new iPads feature two antennas to support Multiple-In-Multiple-Out (MIMO) technology, bringing nearly twice the Wi-Fi performance with data rate possible of going up to 300Mbps. Cellular models too will have better LTE coverage as these will support more LTE networks worldwide. Apple has sold over 170 million iPads and now has 4,75,000 iPad-exclusive applications in the App Store.

Samsung announced a new 98-inch model of its S9 line of Ultra HD TVs at the IFA electronics show on Thursday

Pushing to make the industry dream of 4K TVs a market reality, Samsung unveiled a mammoth new 98-inch S9 model on Thursday at the IFA electronics show and, perhaps more notably, an OLED prototype with the higher screen resolution.

TV makers, eager to find a new selling point for TVs now that flat panels are no longer a novelty, are hoping that quadrupling the number of pixels to the 4K range — 4,096×2,160 is one option — called Ultra HD or UHD. That’s a notable change, as long as you’re sitting close enough to your TV, but the OLED (organic light-emitting diode) shift is potentially bigger since it uses a higher-contrast technology with much deeper blacks than today’s LCD panels.

OLED has proved hard to bring to market, though, which is why it’s significant that Samsung showed the OLED UHD TV. It’s only a proof of concept, not a real product, but it indicates that the company is getting a grasp on manufacturing. It “demonstrates our technology leadership,” said Michael Zoeller, Samsung’s European marketing director for TV and audiovisual products.

The company said the technology “represents an unprecedented leap forward for picture quality and sharp contrast with its self-emitting pixels and natural motion,” but the real proof of its merits will come when somebody can buy it, and buy it in a large enough size that the 4K resolution isn’t just pixel overkill.

Closer to store shelves is the 55-inch Curved OLED, a TV with a conventional HD resolution of 1080p but an unconventional bowed shape. It’s already on sale in South Korea, but it costs more than $13,000.

“Ladies and gentlemen, the future is not flat,” Zoeller said. “Its curve makes the perceived size of the image larger,” and the OLED technology means “there is life in every pixel.”

In the 4K flat-panel realm, Samsung debuted its new 98-inch UHD screen. It’s a relative of the gargantuan 110-inch S9 TV unveiled at CES in January, but the 98-incher will presumably have a price between that top-end model and the smaller 85-inch alternative, the UN85S9.

Samsung also announced European pricing for two smaller UHD models, the 55-inch and 65-inch F9000 TVs, that cost 4,000 and 6,000 euros, respectively (that’s about $5,270 and $7,912 in U.S. currency). They’re now on sale.

Updated TVs are nice, but the news pales in comparison to Wednesday’s headline news from Samsung’s first press conference, the $300 Samsung Galaxy Gear, a smart watch that pairs with Samsung phones and comes with several apps.Also prominent was the announcement of the Galaxy Note 3 and the Galaxy Note 10.1, a stylus-equipped phablet and tablet, respectively.