Posts Tagged ‘Linux’

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Android Powered Devices have virtual machine in which apps run is one of the huge advantage. Android has been using Dalvik Virtual Machine which make use of JIT (Just-In-Time) Compiler since first version of it. Now it is the decision by Google to include a new runtime in Android 4.4 KitKat known as Android RunTime (ART) which make use of Ahead-Of-Time (AOT) Compilation that promises to make your device faster and your battery last longer ..

Android Virtual Machine : Dalvik vs ART

Android Virtual Machine : Dalvik vs ART

Before we jump into this brand new VM, and why it’s turned off by default, let’s make sure everyone understands what we’re talking about ..

Virtual Machine

Virtual Machines are not physical machines but as a software makes possible to run other machines in a your physical machine. For example consider you having a Windows Machine (Assume as it is the only physical machine you are having with you) and if you want to use a Linux or a Mac System, then Virtual Machine paves the way to running a Linux machine or Mac Machine in your Windows Machine ..

Advantages

One of the advantages is the physical separation of each environment in which all the apps (including viruses, malware, and even crashed apps) are all kept apart from your main OS ..

And the next thing is the ability to run programs written for one architecture on a box that runs something different. For example, the ability to run programs compiled to run on an ARM-based CPU when your computer is running an Intel-based processor ..

Android and VM

In order to target different many devices like Tablet, Smartphones, PC, TV, Watch and other gadgets running Android on different hardware architecture, Android uses a specialized virtual machine to run their apps ..

The concept lies here. Developers write code and we download those from the Play Store or some other source. This code is mostly uncompiled. When you use those, it gets comipled to target(in otherwords ‘according to’) the type of device we are having ..

Dalvik (JIT Compilation)

Usually Android uses Dalvik Virtual Machine to compile and run. The concept of Dalvik lies here. Dalvik VM uses JIT (Just-In-Time) Comiplation, which means the downloaded and installed app remains uncompiled untill it’s first launch. And when it is launched first time, it gets compiled just in that time and loaded into RAM (main memory) and hence the name Just-In-Time Compilation. This whole process repeats again when the app/os gets restarted ..

ART (AOT Compilation)

Now Android 4.4 KitKat includes a new runtime call “Android runtime”, ART. Unlike JIT, which must compile every app everytime whenever it’s loaded, ART works on a concept called ahead-of-time (AOT) compilation. The Concept lies here. When you download and install an app it automatically pre-compiles. This takes up more space on your device and takes longer to initially install when compared to Dalvik. However, apps launch quicker and are arguably faster when run using ART rather than Dalvik. What’s more, since less time is required to run apps, your processor doesn’t get worked as hard and your battery life may benefit as a result ..

ART is not set Default

ART is currently very experimental. Not every app works properly in ART, and if you already installed all your apps under Dalvik, you’ll need to reboot and wait up to 20 minutes (less if you have fewer apps, more if you’ve got a bunch) for that first boot to complete. You see, it’s got to pre-compile all of them so they’re ready for you. For all of those reasons, ART is disabled by default ..

Benefits

As based on reports from various sources, it is approximated as follows

  1. 50% – 100% increase in speed
  2. 25% increase in battery life

AOT compilation is the future, and ART is the way Google is going to get us there. This is just the first little step toward a much more lofty goal. Perhaps ART will be the standard runtime in Android 5.0 ..

For further more information visit here ..

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The Ubuntu community is developing a Facebook application for Ubuntu smartphones ready for launch later this year. It will be an Ubuntu Web App, which takes web based applications, such as Facebook, and enables them to act just like native applications. Web apps integrate with the Ubuntu phone’s interface for functions such as launch, notifications and controls. This means that you can launch Facebook directly from the homescreen and see new messages and notifications in the “messages” bar on the screen without ever having to launch the application.The Facebook web app will also integrate with Ubuntu online accounts, which lets users register their Facebook details so that Ubuntu can automatically authenticate the app while using Ubuntu. This gives a hassle-free way to manage applications, so you don’t have to enter details each time you log in and it keeps you in control.

The judging is finished and the scores are in, we now have the winners of this year’s Ubuntu App Showdown! Over the course of six weeks, and using a beta release of the new Ubuntu SDK, our community of app developers were able to put together a number of stunningly beautiful, useful, and often highly entertaining apps.

We had everything from games to productivity tools submitted to the competition, written in QML, C++ and HTML5. Some were ports of apps that already existed on other platforms, but the vast majority were original apps created specifically for the Ubuntu platform. Best of all, these apps are all available to download and install from the new Click store on Ubuntu phones and tablets, so if you have a Nexus device or one with a community image of Ubuntu, you can try these and many more for yourself. Now, on to the winners!

Karma Machine (Original Apps)

Machine is wonderful app for browsing Reddit, and what geek wouldn’t want a good Reddit app? Developed by Brian Robles, Karma Machine has nearly everything you could want in a Reddit app, and takes advantage of touch gestures to make it easy to upvote and downvote both articles and comments. It even supports user accounts so you can see your favorite subreddits easily. On top of it’s functionality, Karma Machine is also visually appealing, with a good mix of animations, overlays and overall use of colors and layouts. It is simply one of the best Reddit clients on any platform (having written my own Reddit client, that’s saying something!), and having it as an original Ubuntu app makes it a valuable addition to our ecosystem. With all that, it’s little wonder that Karma Machine was tied for the top spot on the judges list!

Saucy Bacon (Original Apps)

Something for the foodies among us, Saucy Bacon is a great way to find and manage recipes for your favorite dish. Backed by food2fork.com, this app lets you search for recipes from all over the web. You can save them for future reference, and mark your favorites for easy access over and over again. And since any serious cook is going to modify a recipe to their own tastes, Saucy Bacon even lets you edit recipes downloaded from somewhere else. You can of course add your own unique recipe to the database as well. It even lets you add photos to the recipe card directly from the camera, showing off some nice integration with the Ubuntu SDK’s sensor APIs and hardware capabilities. All of this mouth-watering goodness secured developer Giulio Collura’s Saucy Bacon app a tie for the #1 stop for original Ubuntu apps in our contest.

Snake (Ported Apps)

The game Snake has taken many forms on many platforms throughout the years. It’s combination of simple rules and every-increasing difficulty has made it a popular way to kill time for decades. Developer Brad Wells has taken this classic game from Nokia’s discontinued Meego/Harmattan mobile OS, which used a slightly older version of Qt for app development, and updated it to work on Ubuntu using the Ubuntu SDK components. Meego had a large number of high quality apps written for it back in it’s day, and this game proves that Ubuntu for phones and tablets can give those apps a new lease on life.

Go and get them all!

The 2013 Ubuntu App Showdown was an opportunity for us to put the new Ubuntu SDK beta through some real-world testing, and kick off a new app ecosystem for Ubuntu. During the course of these six weeks we’ve received great feedback from our developer community, worked out a large number of bugs in the SDK, and added or plan to add many new features to our platform.

In addition to being some of the first users of the Ubuntu SDK, the app developers were also among the first to use the new Click packaging format and tools as well as the new app upload process that we’ve been working on to reduce review times and ease the process of publishing apps. The fact that all of the submitted apps have already been published in the new app store is a huge testament to the success of that work, and to the engineers involved in designing and delivering it.Once again congratulations to Brian Robles, Giulio Collura and Brad Wells, and a big thank you to everybody who participated or helped those who participated, and all of the engineers who have worked on building the Ubuntu SDK, Click tools and app store. And if you have a supported device, you should try out the latest Ubuntu images, and try these and the many other apps already available for it. And if you’re an app developer, or want to become an app developer, now is your time to get started with the Ubuntu SDK!

German inventors have developed a new pen that gently vibrates every time it senses a spelling mistake or sloppy handwriting.

Lernstift is a regular pen with real ink but inside it, is a special motion sensor and a small battery-powered Linux computer with a Wi-Fi chip.

These parts allow the pen to recognize specific movements, letter shapes and know a wide assortment of words. If it senses bad letter formation or messy handwriting, it will vibrate, ‘ABC News’ reported.

Users can choose between two functions: Calligraphy Mode pointing out flaws of form and legibility or Orthography Mode recognizing words and comparing the word to a language database. If the word isn’t recognized, the pen will vibrate, according to Daniel Kaesmacher, the 33-year-old co-founder of Lernstift from Munich. The other co-founder , 36-year-old Falk Wolsky had the idea for the pen last year while his 10-year-old son was doing his homework.

“His son had been struggling with his work and staying focused and Falk thought there should be a pen that gives him some sort of signal so he stays focused ,” Kaesmacher said.

After a year and a half in development, the founders have now brought Lernstift to Kickstarter to begin raising money and gauging interest.

 

Considering that Steve Ballmer has been chief executive of Microsoft for more than a decade, it might sound strange to say this. But the sweeping reorganization announced Wednesday made it clear that Microsoft is now his company.

But in the various memos and news releases, the company emphasized that while Windows remains crucial to its future, it’s no longer the way Microsoft wants to define itself. The company is now about “devices and services,” Ballmer said in a memo.

“Ballmer has definitely placed his stamp on Microsoft, meaning the ‘Gates era’ has come to an end,” said Patrick Moorhead of Moor Insights & Strategy. “He is fundamentally shifting the company from an operating system company to services and devices company. In a world where operating systems are free, as in the case of Android, iOS and Linux, Windows is a lot less important.”

To accelerate that shift, Microsoft is collapsing the number of divisions from eight to four. Ballmer wants to promote more collaboration at a company often seen as internally fractious.

It’s a radical push to remake the company. But there’s no arguing that the reorganization is the capstone to one of the most remarkable years of transformation we’ve seen at a technology giant.

Under Ballmer, Microsoft has engaged in a historic upheaval of nearly every part of its massive product line.

Much of that has been documented in bits and pieces. The biggest news was the redesign that came with Windows 8. But there’s also the launch of Outlook.com, the new Windows Phones, the new Xbox One coming later this year, a new cloud-based version of Office.com. And the list goes on.

And, of course, there’s been the push to build its own tablet, the Surface. In the announcement, Ballmer promised to continue working with third parties as it has traditionally done, but also to keep looking for ways to build more of its own devices.

Many of these moves have come in for heavy criticism. Sales of the Surface have not been stellar. Windows 8 has failed to stem a steep decline in PC sales.

But from the point of view of the new Microsoft, all this matters less than you think. With the new guiding philosophy, Windows is not the sole benchmark by which to measure its success or failures. Rather, the company wants to be given credit for the enormous breadth of things it does for both consumers and enterprise, and how well all of those things work together.

Indeed, while some of the consumer offerings have failed to catch fire so far, the enterprise side of Microsoft has been growing quite nicely in recent months.

So much so, that investors seem, at least for the moment, to be optimistic that this new, post-Windows Microsoft, has a fighting chance. The stock in mid-day trading Wednesday was up $0.67 or 1.93% to $35.37. The stock has been on a decent run this year, up more than 24% and coming close to the $36 per share mark it last reached in 2007.

Of course, for all the major surgery at Microsoft, it remains to be seen whether this will translate into a company that can grow at the pace investors want over the long term. Or whether it can regain any sense of leadership in the fast-moving worlds of mobile and cloud technologies, where so far the company has been outflanked by rivals such as Apple and Google.

Ballmer’s legacy is now firmly tied to these remarkable changes. Whether he’s remembered as a transformative corporate visionary or a bumbling, misguided chief executive will depend more on what happens in his second decade running the company than his first.