Posts Tagged ‘ipad’

The troubled mobile phone maker BlackBerry still has at least one very loyal customer: US President Barack Obama.

At a meeting with youth to promote his landmark healthcare law, Obama said he is not allowed to have Apple’s smartphone, the iPhone, for “security reasons,” though he still uses Apple’s tablet computer, the iPad.

Apple was one of several tech companies that may have allowed the National Security Agency(NSA) direct access to servers containing customer data, according to revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The companies deny the allegation.

Obama fought to keep his BlackBerry after coming to the White House in 2009, though he said only 10 people have his personal email address. Neither George W. Bush nor Bill Clinton used email during their presidencies.

BlackBerry, a Canadian company formerly known as Research In Motion, virtually invented the idea of on-the-go email, but lost its market stranglehold as rivals brought out more consumer-friendly devices, like Apple’s iPhone and phones using Google’s Android software. The company recently halted plans to be sold and is trying to chart a new course by focusing on large business and government clients.

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With the new model is being referred to as iPhone 6, it had briefly surfaced some new features.

iPHONE 6 SCREEN
It’s pretty safe to assume that the iPhone 6 is going to have a larger screen size than the existing iPhone 6. Most of the rumours are that the iPhone 6 will have a 4.8in screen (4.5in and 5in screen sizes have also been put forwards), which would make the phone similar in size to the Samsung Galaxy S4 and the HTC One. At this screen size, Apple could then move to a Full HD (1,920×1,080) resolution or even go beyond.

While Apple has not previously made a large-screen phone, upping the screen size for the iPhone 6 makes a lot of sense. It means it can compete with the large-screen phones from other manufacturers and keep the iPhone 5S as a smaller alternative, giving iPhone users more choice.

Tim Cook has said, “Some customers value large screen size, others value other factors such as resolution, colour quality, white balance, brightness, reflectivity, screen longevity, power consumption, portability, compatibility with apps and many things. Our competitors had made some significant trade-offs in many of these areas in order to ship a larger display. We would not ship a larger display iPhone while these trade-offs exist.”

What that statement says, to us, is that Apple won’t ship a large-screen iPhone until it’s managed to iron out all of the trade-offs. A thinner screen, to make a lighter phone, could well be the right way to go, then.

It’s no wonder, then, that Apple may also be considering the screen technology that it uses, with a Sharp IGZO (Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide) screen top of the list. This new technology allows for screens that use less power and are considerably thinner. Rumours certainly picked up when the Sharp IGZO technology was demonstrated at CES 2013.

iPHONE 6 GAZE DETECTION
A bigger screen requires more power, so any technology that can increase battery life has to be good. For the iPhone 6 Apple could be about to revisit gaze detection technology, where the phone can tell if you’re looking at the screen or not. If you were to look away, the phone could pause a video playing and turn the screen off. Patently Apple has dug up the full information on how the technology is likely to work.

Given that Samsung has similar technology in its Galaxy S4 smartphone, we’d say there’s a high chance that Apple will follow suit and implement its own version.

iPHONE 6 iOS 7
We already have iOS 7, so it makes sense that this operating system will be used for the iPhone 6. It’s possible, given that the iPhone 5S has features specific to it, that the OS will be updated to introduce new features with the new handset. For example, it could enable NFC is Apple decides that it wants the technology to use for mobile payments; we wouldn’t bet on it, though, as it seems steadfastly against it.

iPHONE 6 CAMERA
For the iPhone 5S Apple upped the physical size of its 8-megapixel sensor, meaning that each pixel gets more light. In addition, it upgraded the lens from an f/2.4 model to an f/2.2 model, increasing low-light performance again. Combined with the A7 SoC, the camera has a couple of neat modes, including a 10fps burst mode that goes on until the phone’s memory is full, and a 120fps slow-motion mode.

It would make sense if Apple was to use this sensor in the iPhone 6, although, given it’s a bigger phone, with more room inside for components, it could well up the pixel count, with a 12- or 13-megapixel on the cards.

iPHONE 6 STORAGE
In terms of storage, 64GB has been the top model for a couple of years, and continues to be so for the iPhone 5S. We’re not expecting this to change for the iPhone 6, although we know that the Apple can make a 128GB model, thanks to the recent launch of a 128GB iPad 4.

The new model doubled the maximum capacity of the previous high-end iPad (64GB). This update was said to be about increasing the variety of uses for the tablet, with Apple stating that more storage was good for large files for use in applications such as CAD and music production. It’s also a more useful amount of storage for photos and videos.

iPHONE 6 TOUCH ID
Touch ID, the fingerprint reader, was the one of the big talking points for the iPhone 5S. Recent rumours suggest that Touch ID will also come to the iPad 5 and iPad Mini 2, so we’d really expect it on the iPhone 6.

Touch ID works brilliant and encourages people to be more secure, as using it requires a passcode to be set. At the moment, Touch ID can only be used to unlock the iPhone and to authorise iTunes and App Store payments, but it would make sense for Apple to be thinking about new applications for the technology. We can easily see a future where banking apps, for example, are authenticated through the phone.

For the technology really to be taken seriously, we’d expect to see it in as many mobile devices as possible, which obviously includes the iPhone 6. The only real question is, will we see Touch ID open up any new features? If Apple was to include a NFC chip, then Touch ID could be used to authenticate payments. We’re not necessarily expecting NFC, though, as Apple has so far been dead set against including it.

iPHONE 6 A7 SoC
Apple has just released the A7 SoC chip for its iPhone 5S, which is proving to be very fast. It’s got some great custom features, too, including the Image Signal Processor for the camera, which lets the iPhone 5S shoot fast bursts and slow motion video. Given that this 64-bit chip is brand-new, we can’t see Apple completely changing it for the iPhone 6.

Instead, we may get an upgraded version for the iPhone 6. This could include more cores, perhaps moving from dual-core to quad-core, and perhaps a faster graphics core, similar to how the current iPad has an A6X processor, which is the iPhone version with quad-core graphics.

Leaked shots, before it was released, of the iPhone 5S correctly showed that it had a brand-new processor, the A7.

iPHONE 6 PRICE
Apple typically releases its new models at the same price as the old ones. If that holds out, then, and assuming that the 16GB model is dropped, we’d expect the 32GB model to cost £529, the 64GB model £599 and the 128GB model £699. However, if the company continues to sell the iPhone 5S, we could be in for some new pricing, with the iPhone 6 a premium model that sits above it, in which case all bets are off and we have no idea how much it will be.

Apple took design cuesits smaller iPad mini and made the larger format tablet thinner and lighter, renaming it iPad Air. It also revamped the iPad mini with Retina display.

The new iPads have a number of small internal improvements which were seen in the recently launched iPhone 5S.

At an event in California US, on Tuesday, the company launched its new crop of products, including the two new iPads and Macbook Pro laptops, while also announcing the availability of its latest operating system OSX Mavericks as a free download.

The latest iPad Air and the new iPad mini with much-awaited Retina display come at a time when the Cupertino-based iPhone and iPad maker is facing a growing challengethe Google Android-based tabletsmanufacturersSamsung, LG and Asus.

However, given the pricing of the iPads, it is obvious Apple does not want to compete in non-premium tablet category as it does in the smartphone business with iPhones.

iPad Air is 20% thinner, 28% lighter and has 43% smaller bezels than last year’s iPad 4, which has curiously been stopped by Apple even as it will continue to sell the earlier generation iPads. The 9.7 inch iPad Air with Retina display resembles iPad mini a lot. It is 7.5mm thick and weighs 1 pound. Apple claimed it is the thinnest full-sized tablet in the world.

iPad Air uses the same 64-bit A7 chip and the M7 motion co-processor that was introduced recently with the iPhone 5S. It can open files and render graphics twice as fast as the iPad 4, while still promising the same 10-hour battery life.

The new model will hit the shelves on November 1 and come in Space Grey and Silver colours. It will be available at $499, $599, $699 and $799 for the 16GB, 32GB, 64GB and 128GB Wi-Fi models respectively. The Wi-Fi and 4G models will cost another $130 over and above that in case of each model.

iPad Air comes with a disappointing 5MP rear iSight camera, but a 1.2MP front-facing HD camera for FaceTime with improved backside illumination sensors features larger pixels for better low-light performance. It is powered by iOS 7, which is the latest version of the software and brings featuresrevamped search, notifications, control centre and the iCloud Keychain password manager.

Curiously, while Apple phased out last year’s iPad 4its portfolio, it has retained in its lineup the iPad 2, which was launched two years ago. The fourth-generation iPad was launched last October.

Apple also unveiled the new iPad mini with Retina display which was much-awaited. The Retina iPad mini has twice the screen resolution than the first model at 2048x1536p in the same 7.9-inch display. It also runs on the 64-bit A7 chipset, a huge upgrade over the A5 chip used in the previous version. The new iPad mini too will be launched in November and come in Silver and Space Grey colours.

The mini-tablet also runs iOS 7 and comes with the same 5MP iSight and 1.2MP front camera for FaceTime. The Retina iPad mini will cost $399 for the 16GB Wi-Fi model and $529 for 16GB Wi-Fi and 4G variant. The 32GB, 64GB and 128GB Wi-Fi models have been priced at $499, $599 and $699, while their respective Wi-Fi and cellular variants cost another $130 over and above for each model.

The company has also retained the iPad mini launched last year, but cut its price by $30,$329 to $299. Apple also showcased two covers for the iPad Air and Retina iPad mini priced at $69 and $79, respectively.

Both new iPads feature two antennas to support Multiple-In-Multiple-Out (MIMO) technology, bringing nearly twice the Wi-Fi performance with data rate possible of going up to 300Mbps. Cellular models too will have better LTE coverage as these will support more LTE networks worldwide. Apple has sold over 170 million iPads and now has 4,75,000 iPad-exclusive applications in the App Store.

Previous rumors about limited supply of Apple’s iPad Mini Retina seem to be coming true.

Apple’s updated iPad Mini page states that the new Retina version of Apple’s most popular iPad won’t be available until “later in November”.

But even when the $399 tablet (starting price) becomes available in November, the initial supply may be a relative trickle if demand goes through the roof.

“The supply for that product is severely constrained,” said Rhoda Alexander, director of Tablet and Monitor Research at IHS iSuppli.

“We don’t expect to see meaningful volume until first quarter [of 2014].”
Part of the problem seems to be centered on making enough of the pixel-dense Mini’s 7.9-inch 2048-by-1536 Retina Displays.

That’s the same resolution on Apple’s larger iPad Air but in a much smaller package which drives up pixel density, making it more difficult to make in the very high volumes that Apple needs.

The iPad Air has a pixel density of a relatively modest 264 pixels per inch, but that jumps to 326 pixels per inch for the new Mini.

Apple faced supply-demand problems for the original Mini too.Apple did not respond to a request for comment.

Alongside new iPads and Macs, Apple on Tuesday quietly released an iOS update that brings new features and fixes others.

iOS 7.0.3, which went out as a free update today, brings back iCloud Keychain — a feature that was originally slated to launch with iOS 7, but did not make it into the final release.

iCloud Keychain stores information like logins and credit card information synced up and available between devices. That comes with a new feature in Safari for iOS that can generate complex passwords.

Alongside the new feature, Apple also beefed up an older one that disabled some of the snazzy new visual effects in iOS 7. That includes the parallax shifting that occurs while users move their device around, as well as the animations that have app icons fall down onto the screen every time the device is unlocked.

Those animations were causing issues for some users, who found them to be dizzying. The new option ditches the zooming between apps and other system menus, in favor of a simpler cross fade effect.

Other fixes include a tweak to the lock screen that delays when it pops up the “slide to unlock” language for iPhone 5S users with the Touch ID system enabled, as well as bringing back an option to search from the Web and Wikipedia from within the built-in Spotlight search tool.iOS was was released to users last month. Prior updates focused on ironing out some early kinks, including a security issue that allowed users to unlock devices without a passcode.

A mockup of a prospective Apple iWatch

An Apple iWatch may not be a huge revenue booster but it could still capture as many as 10 million customers.

Based on a Piper Jaffray survey of 799 US consumers, analyst Gene Munster believes Apple could sell between 5 million and 10 million smartwatches during the initial launch year. The recent poll asked people whether they would buy a $350 iWatch that can connect to an iPhone.

At first glance, the survey results don’t seem to bode well. Among iPhone owners polled, only 12 percent said they’d be interested in buying an Apple iWatch, leaving 88 percent on the sidelines. On a global basis, that percentage is likely to be even lower. Still, that means anywhere from 2 percent to 4 percent of iPhone users around the world may actually buy the watch during the first year.

How would that impact Apple’s bottom line? Very little, Munster indicated in an investors note released Monday. Assuming a midpoint estimate of 7.5 million iWatch sales, Apple’s revenue and gross profits would each rise by just 1 percent. But the analyst sees other benefits from an Apple smartwatch.

“While we do not view the watch as a likely needle-mover for Apple in terms of revenue in 2014, we put it in a similar category as the television in that it could demonstrate Apple’s ability to innovate (good for the multiple) and potentially lead to a more meaningful new product category in wearable tech,” Munster said.

The analyst believes there’s a 60 percent chance Apple will unveil an iWatch in 2014.

Delta Air Lines has decided to jump on Microsoft’s Surface bandwagon.

Delta will deploy the Surface 2 to 11,000 pilots by the end of 2014, the airline and Microsoft announced Monday. The airline will equip Boeing 757 and Boeing 767 pilots with the Surface 2 later this year, and will roll it out to all other cockpits by the end of 2014.

Rather than opt for the Surface 2 Pro, Delta has decided to invest in the Windows RT-based Surface 2. The slates will run on Windows RT 8.1 and come with apps the pilots need to complete their jobs, including carts, reference documents, and checklists, Microsoft said. Delta expects to save $13 million per year in fuel and other costs by using the Surface 2.

For Microsoft, the adoption of the Surface 2, in large numbers, for use by pilots is surely a significant customer win. For Delta, the move is a chance to applaud some expected cost savings — the airline says use of the tablets will allow it to cut 7.5 million sheets of paper per year and reduce fuel consumption by 1.2 million gallons annually.Before Delta can use the Surface 2 for all phases of the flight process, the company needs to get Federal Aviation Administration approval. According to Microsoft, Delta expects to receive full approval from the FAA to use the Surface 2 on all devices and flight phases sometime next year.

As part of the IFA flood of new laptops, tablets, and other products, Lenovo is introducing a new PC line, as well as serious revisions to the popular Yoga hybrid. Also new, an Android tablet called the S5000 and a phone called the Vibe X, both of which claim to be especially lightweight.

The Hands-on impressions, photos, and video of Lenovo’s new PC lineup, including a high-res update of the popular Yoga hybrid, and a brand new Yoga version from the ThinkPad brand, which includes a keyboard update that’s been on our wish list for some time.

IdeaPad Flex 14

The IdeaPad Flex line, available in 14- and 15-inch versions, doesn’t fold all the way back into a tablet like the Yoga does. This is more of a laptop with some extra flexibility, bending its screen back by 300 degrees to allow for what we’ve been calling a kiosk mode, with the screen pointing out from the rear of the laptop, away from the keyboard and touch pad.


IdeaPad Flex 20

Unlike earlier tabletop PC such as the HP Rove 20 and original Sony Vaio Tap 20, which both weigh around 12 pounds, the $899 Flex 20 is closer to 8 pounds. That’s about the same as Sony’s just-announced 21-inch Tap 21, and a little more than Dell’s excellent, and extremely thin, 18-inch XPS 18.


IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro

How do you top the much-loved original? In the case of the just-announced Yoga 2 Pro, the star of the show is an ultra-high-res 13.3-inch display, with a native resolution of 3,200×1,800 pixels. That puts the Yoga 2 in similar territory to
the Toshiba Kirabook, Retina MacBook Pro, Chromebook Pixel, Samsung Ativ Book 9 Plus, and a handful of others.


ThinkPad Yoga

Lenovo has a new take on the Yoga that should make a lot of people very happy. This new ThinkPad-branded model has a seriously engineered keyboard and chassis that pulls the keys into the body as you fold it over backward into tablet mode
Finally, the 7-inch IdeaTab S5000 claims to be lighter than either the iPad Mini or Nexus 7, but has only a 1,280×800 display and a 1.2GHz quad-core MediaTek 8389 CPU. It should be available in December. The Android 4.2 smartphone known as the Vibe X has a 5-inch screen and weighs just 4.1 ounces, but there are currently no plans to release it in the US.

Today marks the fifth anniversary of the Apple App Store. And perhaps one of the most amazing things about this milestone is that it never would have happened if things had played out the way Steve Jobs wanted.

Just imagine if there were no iPhone apps and no App Store. Aside from creating billions of dollars in value for developers, Apps have been a cornerstone to the success of the iPhone and iPad.

The fact that the App Store does exist is a testament to a characteristic of Jobs and Apple for which neither tends to get much credit. They listen to users.

To understand why, you have to jump back to a piece of history that is often forgotten.

Today, people look at the App Store as part of some master vision cooked up by Jobs. Critics of Apple look at it as symbolic of Apple’s and Jobs’ desire to control every aspect of their technology.

But when the iPhone first landed in 2007, the company was primarily concerned that it actually work and be seen as a stable device when it got into the hands of users. So Apple did not make it possible for third parties to write apps that ran on the phone, worried that glitchy apps might ding the iPhone’s reputation.

Instead, if people wanted applications to run on the iPhone, the company said they could write so-called “Web apps,” little programs that ran inside the mobile browser.

Now, if that had become the dominant way people developed apps as Apple and Jobs expected, then most of these would be able to run on any mobile platform. You wouldn’t have to write one version for iOS, one for Android, and so on. In such a world, Apple wouldn’t have the towering advantage it currently has with the top mobile app developers.

But, of course, that’s not what happened.

What happened, almost immediately, is that people started “jailbreaking” the iPhone to install apps they had written directly onto the phone, so-called “native apps.” Apple tried its best to put a stop to this initially by updating the phones’ operating system, which would in turn wipe out apps that had been installed.

The reason developers preferred native apps was simple. Installed directly on the phone, they could run faster and include more features than a Web app that might have to be pulled across the wireless network each time you ran it. Within a few months of the iPhone’s launch, developers had created about 10,000 Web apps.

But even as it tried to limit the jailbreaking, Apple was listening to developers.

Especially persuasive were arguments from game developers, who wanted more horsepower to write richer games, and financial firms who felt native apps would offer more security.

In October 2007, Apple announced it would relent and create a way for people to write apps for the phone. The company said a Software Development Kit or SDK would be available the following year for developers.

Finally, in March 2008, Jobs gathered reporters at Apple headquarters for an iPhone Software Roadmap Event. At the announcement, Jobs said the Software Development Kit was ready and that the company would launch a store in a few months where developers could submit their apps for sale and users could find apps and download them to their iPhones.

(As a footnote, Jobs was also excited that after just eight months, the iPhone already had 28% of the U.S. smartphone marketshare compared with 41% for Research in Motion. How quaint those numbers seem now.)

Anyway, at the end of the announcement, John Doerr of Kleiner Perkins took the stage to announce that his venture firm had created a $100 million iFund to invest in companies looking to develop software for the iPhone.

On July 10, 2008, the App store opened for business. By September 2008, users had downloaded 100 million native apps.

As the fifth anniversary hits, there are now more than 900,000 apps in the store that have been downloaded 50 billion times.

All made possible by a company willing to admit it was wrong, and in the process make one of the most important pivots in recent tech history.

Apple has applied for a trademark for “iWatch” in Japan, a patent official said on Monday, signalling the iPhone maker may be moving ahead with plans for a watch-like device as gadget makers turn their attention to wearable computers  ..

The trademark application, submitted on June 3 and released on the Japan Patent Office website on June 27, would cover computers, computer peripherals and wristwatches, the official said. He said it was unknown how long the application process would require ..

An Apple spokesman in Japan could not immediately be reached for comment ..

Speculation has mounted that Apple is preparing to launch an iWatch and CEO Tim Cook told a gathering of tech and media executives a month ago that wearable products were ripe for exploration, but added he was skeptical, including about Google’s recently unveiled Glass which combines a mobile computer and eyeglasses ..

“There’s nothing that’s going to convince a kid who has never worn glasses or a band or a watch to wear one, or at least I haven’t seen it,” Cook said ..

Wearable devices are considered a potential area for hit products as smartphones such as the iPhone and Samsung Electronics’s Galaxy series are losing their ability to impress consumers and investors ..

Samsung, which has leapfrogged Apple as the world’s leading smartphone maker, is also developing a wearable device similar to a wristwatch, a source with knowledge of the matter has said ..

The New York Times reported in February that Apple was experimenting with the design of a device similar to a wristwatch that would operate on the same iOS platform as its iPhone and iPad and would be made with curved glass ..

Following the revelation that Apple had applied for ‘iWatch’ in Japan, it appears that Apple has done so in Mexico, Taiwan, Turkey and Colombia as well ..

On Monday, reports emerged indicating that Cupertino giant had filed a trademark application for the ‘iWatch’ product name in Japan. Filings, spotted by various Internet users and websites, reveal that similar applications have been submitted to Intellectual property bodies in various other countries ..

According to the filing with Mexico’s Institute of Industrial Property, spotted first by 9to5Mac, Apple applied for the iWatch trademark under two categories pertaining to hardware and software of mobile devices. The application was submitted on June 3, though it was made public recently ..

Another filing with Taiwan’s Intellectual Property Office, retrieved first by MacRumors, also reveals the same iWatch trademark with the colour of the device mentioned as Black ..

Besides these, Apple has also filed for the iWatch trademark in Turkey through an attorney on June 3 and in Russia during the same time period. A trademark filing submitted on June 4th in Colombia has also been spotted by a Twitter user ..

It’s interesting to note that all filings also include a graphic with the term iWatch depicted in upper case letters ..

The move signals that Apple is indeed working on a new wearable device and wants to secure the iWatch moniker in markets across the globe, inline with its other devices that have been christened in the same manner ..

Earlier this year, Bloomberg had reported that Apple’s so-called iWatch is expected to release this year and that the project is currently being fueled by the efforts of over 100 engineers being led by Apple design chief Jony Ive himself ..

A recent report by Apple Insider, also mentioned that Apple’s smart watch is likely to debut in 2014, quoting Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst with KGI Securities who regularly offers predictions on future Apple products ..

Recently, Hon Hai Precision Industry, the company that uses the trade name Foxconn, demonstrated a new smart watch that can be connected with the iPhone. A fews days back, Sony officially launched SmartWatch 2 , the successor to its SmartWatch ..

It’s worth mentioning that companies like Google, Samsung, Microsoft, and LG, are all said to be working on bringing their own smart watch-like devices to the market ..