Posts Tagged ‘India’

Neelam Dhawan is the MD of HP India.

Neelam Dhawan was in the US on an assignment for HCL in 1989 when she had her first child. She was so enthusiastic about her job that she was back to working within seven days of having her baby. It helped that HCL allowed her to work from home.

“I never thought of quitting a job. I had always had ambitions of working and I was passionate about what I did,” says the managing director of Hewlett-Packard (HP) India, a company whose estimated revenue last year was over Rs 30,000 crore.

Long breaks after child birth is one of the biggest reasons for women falling back in their careers and the reason why there are so few women in the top management of companies. Dhawan says breaks need not be career-restraining, so long as women who take breaks keep themselves updated during the months they are away. “Our industry is changing so quickly that if you do not keep yourself updated, you will become dated. You have to have seriousness about your career. You can’t say things like family will be first. You have to set aggressive career goals for yourself.”

Dhawan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from St Stephen’s College in Delhi, and a Masters in business administration from the Faculty of Management Studies in Delhi, today has countrywide responsibility for HP’s revenues and profitability in India and ensuring the greatest leverage from the company’s services, personal systems and imaging & printing businesses. Prior to taking on this position in 2008, she was MD of Microsoft India for three years.

Dhawan says she also benefited from her early work environment. “I was lucky I started when the IT industry was small. The industry grew rapidly, so we also grew quickly.”

She had a great mentor in HCL founder Shiv Nadar. “He encouraged me. I learnt a lot from him – how to take risks, how to take decisions.”

She says mentors and networking are essential for success, but admits these do not come easily to women. “Women are very good at people management, especially within their family; women are the ones who keep in touch. But they do not do much of that outside the family. So in the work environment, it’s the men who are far better at networking and finding mentors.”

But she says the environment is now very conducive for the emergence of women leaders. The IT industry is very open to women as employees, and more so now as it struggles with quality talent. It has flexible policies on timings at work, it allows work from home, and it ensures high levels of safety and security. “Men’s attitude can be demotivating some times, but I don’t see resistance to women among managers.” Dhawan is convinced the next few years will see a huge change. “Women started taking MBA and engineering seriously from the second half of the 1990s. So it’s a matter of time before we see many more women leaders,” she says.

The government is looking at Big Data to analyze huge amounts data available on corporate as well as individuals to increase tax collections.

As government looks at ways to analyze huge amounts data available on corporate as well as individuals to increase tax collections by studying various parameters like spending patterns, IT companies expect strong growth in Big Data and Analytics business in the coming years.

“Government is planning to use analytics to increase its revenue base,” Infosys vice president and India business head Raghu Cavale told PTI.

He said the country’s tax-payer base is just about 3 crore and the number has been inching its way slowly for the last 5-10 years, which the government would like to see growing at a faster pace.

“The economy has been been expanding, which essentially means that the number of people coming in the tax rate should be more. But it is not so,” Cavale added.

Big Data and Analytics businesses of IT firms aim at storing, sorting and analyzing vast amounts of data across various fields — finance, marketing, healthcare, utilities, climate and transaction records.

According to government data, the total tax payers in the country stood at about 3.24 crore during the 2011-12 fiscal.

“As a nation, we can put together all the data. If you travel abroad, buy expensive jewellery, we can check your digital footprints on online shopping and piece together a person’s lifestyle and through that create a taxable database,” Cavale said.

Citing an example, he said the government in Italy follows people’s lifestyle, travel and spending pattern so as to track those who could be evading taxes.

“So can we use this data analytics to expand out taxable database. Our total direct taxes are only 9% of our GDP, whereas it should be about 18%, and you cannot raise it by taxing people who you have already taxed. You are going to use analytics,” he added.

On government’s use of IT for collecting and utilizing income tax information, Cavale said: “We are discussing with the government many projects. Some have already been tendered, which we have won. Some other people are doing it. Government is very well aware of data warehousing and analytics. It is talking to us as well as other firms.”

The Finance Ministry had collected Rs 4.73 lakh crore in indirect taxes during 2012-13. For the current fiscal, it has fixed the target of collecting Rs 5.65 lakh crore in indirect taxes, comprising customs, excise and service tax. The total collection of indirect taxes stood at about Rs 2,28,550 crore during the first six months of 2013-14.

At least two online sellers, Flipkart and Infibeam, have started selling HTC One mini with manufacturer warranty.

HTC One mini, the smaller version of HTC One smartphone, may finally be launched in India soon.

Though the phone has been listed on the Taiwanese company’s Indian website for long, there has been no word when the company would launch it in the country. But online retailers have started selling the smartphone, even though it continues to be listed as ‘Coming Soon’ on HTC India’s site.

At least two online sellers, Flipkart and Infibeam, have started selling HTC One mini with manufacturer warranty. Infibeam is taking pre-orders for the smartphone for Rs 35,054, with delivery date of October 11. On the other hand, Flipkart is selling the smartphone for Rs 37,299, promising delivery within next 6-7 days.

Rival smartphones like Samsung Galaxy S4 mini, Google Nexus 4 and Sony Xperia SP can be purchased for approximately Rs 26,000 in the market.

HTC One Mini has a 4.3-inch screen with 1280x720p resolution and 341ppi pixel density. It runs on Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean), topped with Sense 5.0 user interface, and packs a 1.4GHz dual-core processor under the hood. It has 1GB RAM, 16GB internal storage and no microSD card support.

The new One Mini features a 4MP UltraPixel camera and LED flash on the back, while a 1.6MP unit is present in the front. The handset has connectivity features like 2G, 3G, 4G, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0 and microUSB 2.0. This phone has a 1,800mAh battery and comes with BoomSound speakers and Beats Audio technology for sound enhancement. In terms of design, the HTC One Mini looks exactly like the current flagship, though the dimensions are smaller due to the decrease in screen size.

Google has acquired gesture recognition startup Flutter. The San-Fancisco-based company is founded by Navneet Dalal and Mehul Nariyawala of Indian origin.

No details on the price or the terms of the deal have been released.

Flutter develops gesture recognition technology that controls popular apps like YouTube, Pandora and Netflix via webcam.

Announcing the deal on Flutter’s homepage, CEO Navneet Dalal wrote, “Today, we are thrilled to announce that we will be continuing our research at Google. We share Google’s passion for 10x thinking, and we’re excited to add their rocket fuel to our journey.”

A Google spokesperson too confirmed the deal to the media, “We’re really impressed by the Flutter team’s ability to design new technology based on cutting-edge research. We look forward to supporting and collaborating on their research efforts at Google.”

Flutter was received funding from the likes of Andreessen Horowitz, NEA, Spring Ventures and Y Combinator.The deal has tech circles speculating if the new tech will find its way into Google’s upcoming devices like Nexus 5.

LG launched its G2 smartphone in India today, bringing yet another powerful handset to the already burgeoning Indian smartphone market. This device is a powerful competitor to the Samsung Galaxy S4, Sony Xperia Z1, HTC One and Nokia Lumia 925.

It has all the makings of a champion, from a powerful chipset, gorgeous screen, unique software, and a great camera. No doubt, LG G2 has us intrigued, especially when it comes to design. The company has done away with hardware keys altogether, placing the power and volume keys at the back instead of left or right side as it happens in conventional design.

We were not sure if this new positioning for the keys will make smartphone usage easier, or if it will make it much too difficult to hold the phone, let alone operate it with one hand. We played with the device for some time at the launch event to see what the LG G2 is all about. Here is what we experienced ..

LG G2 looks much too similar to the Samsung Galaxy S4 despite a minor difference between screen size (5.2-inch for G2 vs 5-inch for S4). However, a closer look reveals that the new LG phone bears some differences compared to the now six-months-old S4, such as on-screen keys, no hardware buttons on the sides and overall a bigger device.

The screen of LG G2 is as good as it gets, with beautiful and vibrant colours and crisp text and videos. Around the screen are very thin bezels, helping the phone keep dimensions to a minimum.

Coming to the buttons on the back. Below the camera you will find here keys – Volume Up, Power/Lock and Volume Down, in that order. After using the phone for about 15 minutes straight, it stopped feeling outlandish as we could get a hang of the keys and using them to do common tasks. More on what these keys do below.

Overall, we like the design and look of the G2. The only grouse? Plastic does not feel fantastic, especially after having used the glass-bodied Optimus G earlier.

While you can press the power key on the back to turn on the phone, another option is to tap on the touchscreen twice quickly. This is same as the functionality we have seen in some of the newer Nokia and Samsung phones.

Inside, the software is similar to the Optimus UI we have seen in previous LG phones. However, this time it looks a little less childish, which is the only issue we had with the Android skin.

The phone seems extremely fast, a result of the combination of the light Optimus UI and powerful Snapdragon 800 chipset. All tasks we performed in quick succession went off without a hitch, showing exactly how powerful the chipset is.

We checked out some of the software features of LG G2. Many we had seen in previous phones (placing phone next to the ear to answer calls without pressing any keys in Samsung Galaxy S3 and supersensitive touchscreen in Nokia Lumia 920).

One feature that caught our eye was Slide Aside, where you can use a three-finger swipe from right to left to push a running app to the sidelines. This feature allows users to move or retrieve a maximum of three running apps from the sides. Though not as good as Samsung’s multi app view, it is still worth checking out.

Using G2 for a little more time gave us an idea of how to use its rear-positioned keys for doing more. While the volume and power/lock functions were quite expected, we also used it to access QuickMemo app and turn on the camera when the phone’s screen was turned off. However, you cannot take screenshots with the handset without using both your hands, something we can easily do with a single hand in other Android phones. During our short time with the G2, we found it to be a very capable smartphone that can stand neck-and-neck with any top-end smartphone in the market. Its unconventional design is quite good and does not hinder functionality, even though it does not add much value to the usage.

Panasonic will pull out of the smartphone market in Japan and pare its smartphone operations to outsourced production in emerging markets like India, the company’s president said.

The Japanese electronics company, which has suffered $15 billion in losses over its latest two financial years, is staking its turnaround on a transformation from a consumer gadget maker to a supplier for other businesses.

The architect of this turnaround plan, Panasonic President Kazuhiro Tsuga, has warned he would weed out any division that fails to meet a 5 percent operating margin goal within three years.

Tsuga told Reuters in an interview that the company’s mobile division was likely to lose more than the 1.1 billion yen ($11.02 million) targeted loss for the financial year ending next March. Panasonic’s mobile division posted an 8.1 billion yen loss last year.

“It’s not acceptable for the company to be bleeding red ink like this, so we have to think about ways to develop assets that we do have in a more effective direction,” Tsuga said.

While the company is stepping back from the consumer smartphone market, it has said it is developing smartphones for business use that would be similar to its popular “Toughbook” notebook PC series.

Panasonic is one of several handset makers caught out by the meteoric rise of the two dominant smartphone makers – Apple Inc and Samsung Electronic – which have upended the traditional hierarchy of mobile players.

Microsoft this week agreed to buy Nokia’s phone business, which once dominated the global market but has slipped drastically in recent years.

Japanese consumers, once partial to highly customized feature phones made by Panasonic, NEC and Fujitsu, have since moved in large numbers to Apple’s popular iPhones and Samsung’s Galaxy series.

In 2001, Panasonic was the second-largest handset maker in Japan, after NEC, with more than 19% of the market. Last year, it barely had a 7% share, far behind Apple’s 25 percent lead.

Tsuga said Panasonic did not need to manufacture and sell its own smartphones under a vertically integrated business model, but will instead use the company’s brand to sell phones made by other manufacturers as it does already in India.

The knockout blow to its business came when NTT DoCoMo, Japan’s biggest mobile carrier and a loyal distributor for Japanese-made handsets, announced it would promote only Sony’s flagship Xperia smartphone and the Samsung Galaxy during its summer campaign. NEC announced in July that it would pull out of smartphones after discussions to sell its handset business to Lenovo Group fell through, sources familiar with the matter said.