Posts Tagged ‘HP’

On Nov 5, 2013 the OpenStack Design Summit in Hong Kong, we announced the Ubuntu OpenStack Interoperability Lab (Ubuntu OIL). The programme will test and validate the interoperability of hardware and software in a purpose-built lab, giving Ubuntu OpenStack users the reassurance and flexibility of choice.

They’re launching the programme with many significant partners onboard, such as; Dell, EMC, Emulex, Fusion-io, HP, IBM, Inktank/Ceph, Intel, LSi, Open Compute, SeaMicro, VMware.

The OpenStack ecosystem has grown rapidly giving businesses access to a huge selection of components for their cloud environments. Most will expect that, whatever choices they make or however complex their requirements, the environment should ‘just work’, where any and all components are interoperable. That’s why they created the Ubuntu OpenStack Interoperability Lab.

Ubuntu OIL is designed to offer integration and interoperability testing as well as validation to customers, ISVs and hardware manufacturers. Ecosystem partners can test their technologies’ interoperability with Ubuntu OpenStack and a range of software and hardware, ensuring they work together seamlessly as well as with existing processes and systems. It means that manufacturers can get to market faster and with less cost, while users can minimise integration efforts required to connect Ubuntu OpenStack with their infrastructure.

Ubuntu is about giving customers choice. Over the last releases, they’ve introduced new hypervisors, and software-defined networking (SDN) stacks, and capabilities for workloads running on different types of public cloud options. Ubuntu OIL will test all of these options as well as other technologies to ensure Ubuntu OpenStack offers the broadest set of validated and supported technology options compatible with user deployments. Ubuntu OIL will test and validate for all supported and future releases of Ubuntu, Ubuntu LTS and OpenStack.

Involvement in the lab is through our Canonical Partner Programme. New partners can sign up here.

Former CEO : Wang

New CEO : Jim Wong

Taiwan’s Acer Inc, the world’s no.4 PC vendor, posted a worse-than-expected net loss of T$13.12 billion ($446 million) in the third quarter, with the company aiming to revamp itself with a new CEO and job cuts.

Acer chairman and CEO JT Wang is announcing his resignation from the PC maker today following further disappointing financial results. Wang, an outspoken critic of Microsoft’s Surface tablet, will step down as Acer CEO on January 1st, but will retain his chairman position until the second quarter of 2014 to assist with existing commitments. Acer president Jim Wong will take over as CEO in January in a clear effort to address the struggles the company is facing.

Acer is still the fourth largest PC manufacturer in the world, but the company’s revenues have taken a hit recently as PC sales have slowed across the industry. The company reported a net loss of $446 million in Q3, and it now plans to cut its staff headcount by seven percent globally in an effort to save $100 million in annual operating expenses. While PC sales continue to impact manufacturers, the top three — Lenovo, HP, and Dell — experience small growth in the most recent quarter according to IDC. Acer’s PC sales dropped by nearly 35 percent in Q3, highlighting the problems the company faces to turn its business around.

“Q3’s operating loss was mainly due to the gross margin impact of gearing up for the Windows 8.1 sell-in and the related management of inventory,” the company said in a statement.Acer said there was also an intangible asset impairment loss, which includes trademarks and goodwill, of T$$9.94 billion during the repoting period.Sixteen analysts polled by Thomson Reuters SmartEstimates had forecast a median loss of T$109 million for the quarter. ($1 = 29.4180 Taiwan dollars).

Neelam Dhawan is the MD of HP India.

Neelam Dhawan was in the US on an assignment for HCL in 1989 when she had her first child. She was so enthusiastic about her job that she was back to working within seven days of having her baby. It helped that HCL allowed her to work from home.

“I never thought of quitting a job. I had always had ambitions of working and I was passionate about what I did,” says the managing director of Hewlett-Packard (HP) India, a company whose estimated revenue last year was over Rs 30,000 crore.

Long breaks after child birth is one of the biggest reasons for women falling back in their careers and the reason why there are so few women in the top management of companies. Dhawan says breaks need not be career-restraining, so long as women who take breaks keep themselves updated during the months they are away. “Our industry is changing so quickly that if you do not keep yourself updated, you will become dated. You have to have seriousness about your career. You can’t say things like family will be first. You have to set aggressive career goals for yourself.”

Dhawan, who holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from St Stephen’s College in Delhi, and a Masters in business administration from the Faculty of Management Studies in Delhi, today has countrywide responsibility for HP’s revenues and profitability in India and ensuring the greatest leverage from the company’s services, personal systems and imaging & printing businesses. Prior to taking on this position in 2008, she was MD of Microsoft India for three years.

Dhawan says she also benefited from her early work environment. “I was lucky I started when the IT industry was small. The industry grew rapidly, so we also grew quickly.”

She had a great mentor in HCL founder Shiv Nadar. “He encouraged me. I learnt a lot from him – how to take risks, how to take decisions.”

She says mentors and networking are essential for success, but admits these do not come easily to women. “Women are very good at people management, especially within their family; women are the ones who keep in touch. But they do not do much of that outside the family. So in the work environment, it’s the men who are far better at networking and finding mentors.”

But she says the environment is now very conducive for the emergence of women leaders. The IT industry is very open to women as employees, and more so now as it struggles with quality talent. It has flexible policies on timings at work, it allows work from home, and it ensures high levels of safety and security. “Men’s attitude can be demotivating some times, but I don’t see resistance to women among managers.” Dhawan is convinced the next few years will see a huge change. “Women started taking MBA and engineering seriously from the second half of the 1990s. So it’s a matter of time before we see many more women leaders,” she says.