Posts Tagged ‘Blackberry’

The troubled mobile phone maker BlackBerry still has at least one very loyal customer: US President Barack Obama.

At a meeting with youth to promote his landmark healthcare law, Obama said he is not allowed to have Apple’s smartphone, the iPhone, for “security reasons,” though he still uses Apple’s tablet computer, the iPad.

Apple was one of several tech companies that may have allowed the National Security Agency(NSA) direct access to servers containing customer data, according to revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The companies deny the allegation.

Obama fought to keep his BlackBerry after coming to the White House in 2009, though he said only 10 people have his personal email address. Neither George W. Bush nor Bill Clinton used email during their presidencies.

BlackBerry, a Canadian company formerly known as Research In Motion, virtually invented the idea of on-the-go email, but lost its market stranglehold as rivals brought out more consumer-friendly devices, like Apple’s iPhone and phones using Google’s Android software. The company recently halted plans to be sold and is trying to chart a new course by focusing on large business and government clients.

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BlackBerry’s BBM messenger service keeps chugging along.

The company said that BBM has racked up more than 10 million downloads in its first 24 hours.

“I’ve seen reports of apps that launched with 1 million downloads in a day, but over 10 million? Amazing,” BlackBerry executive Andrew Bocking said on the company’s blog.

BBM actually garnered 5 million downloads in its first 8 hours. The app has since zoomed to the top on Apple’s App Store, garnering mostly positive ratings.

BBM hasn’t yet shown up on Google Play, but that could be because Google doesn’t update the list as frequently. Bocking noted there have been 60,000 five-star reviews out of 87,000 total reviews.There was significant demand for the iOS and Android version of BBM, with 6 million registering ahead of time to get information on the app. There was so much interest that BlackBerry had to institute a wait list for people who hadn’t registered ahead of time.

It’s getting only tougher for struggling BlackBerry as T-Mobile, one of the top U.S. carriers, said it will no longer sell the Canadian smartphones in its stores.

The only customers who are still interested in purchasing BlackBerry are business professionals, and they do not buy their devices in stores, said David Carey, T-Mobile’s executive vice president for corporate services, according to a Reuters report.

“Keeping stock in the retail distribution system was inefficient,” Carey told Reuters.

The T-Mobile announcement is another major blow to BlackBerry’s prospects.

The Canadian phone manufacturer was once the leader in mobile, but after the launch of the Apple iPhone and smartphones that run Google’s Android platform, BlackBerry began slipping in both market share and innovation.

Now, BlackBerry is practically irrelevant in the U.S. consumer market.The company has struggled so much it put itself up for a sale. BlackBerry reached a deal this week with Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. to be bought for $4.7 billion. BlackBerry shareholders will receive $9 per share under the tentative deal.

Samsung has signed a deal with an anti-virus firm to offer improved protection to its Galaxy-branded Android devices.

It will use San Francisco-based Lookout’s software to scan handsets and tablets for threats.

The feature will be targeted at business users as part of the firm’s forthcoming Knox security product, which was announced in February.

Numerous studies have indicated that many hackers have focused their efforts on Google’s Android system.

Analysts said the move was designed to reassure companies that Samsung’s Android phones were a safe alternative to the Blackberry and Windows Phone platforms which have promoted their enterprise security facilities as key features.

More malware
Lookout’s chief executive blogged that malware protection had become increasingly important at a time more employees were linking their own devices to office networks.

“One in three companies now allow employees to bring their own devices to work, and whether or not it’s allowed, employees are doing so and company data is being accessed outside of the corporate network, potentially putting that data at risk,” wrote John Hering.

The company said its servers would scan Samsung’s mobile devices against known malware that could be introduced via email attachments, webpages or file-sharing services.

Other anti-virus firms have also been quick to play up the threat to Android devices.

Kaspersky recently announced that it had detected 57,000 new examples of malware specifically targeting the operating system since the start of the year.

McAfee has also warned that new types of spyware and code designed to bypass bank ID protection had helped swell the amount of Android malware by 35% in the April-to-June quarter.

The US government has also issued its own alert suggesting 79% of all malware threats to mobile operating systems were directed at Android in 2012.

“Android is the most insecure mobile system of all the mobile ones, and that’s been made more difficult because it’s so fragmented,” said Richard Absalom, an analyst at telecoms consultancy Ovum.

“It’s not just that that people are still running old versions of the software, but that Samsung and other vendors are forking the OS in different ways.”

Google itself has taken steps to address the problem. Earlier this month it banned apps from its Play store that make changes to a device without the owner’s knowledge or consent.

But one expert suggested the firm had still not gone far enough.

“New variants of Android malware are found every day, with most designed to steal money from users by signing them up for expensive premium rate SMS scams,” independent security analyst Graham Cluley told the BBC.

“Much of the Android malware has disguised itself as fake versions of popular apps like Angry Birds or Instagram, and although its normally encountered in unofficial app stores they have also managed to intrude into Google’s official Play store on a worrying number of occasions.”

Defence-approved
Samsung began offering its Knox product to selected Galaxy S4 handsets in May and has promised it would be extended to other devices.

The Pentagon is among organisations to have authorised the use of handsets which include the feature.

“This approval enables other government agencies and regulated industries such as healthcare and financial services to adopt Samsung Galaxy smartphones and tablets,” the South Korean firm said at the time.

Ovum suggested the latest announcement would help give the company an edge over other Android manufacturers such as Sony, HTC and LG.

“What Samsung is doing here is seeing a gap in the market,” said Mr Absalom.

“Blackberry’s share within enterprise is dropping and Windows Phone isn’t picking up as fast as Microsoft might have hoped.”Samsung is the biggest individual smartphone manufacturer out there and it thinks it can now make a major play in the corporate market.”