Posts Tagged ‘4K resolution’

Apple CEO Tim Cook, in a letter to employees, has said that 2014 will be a big year for the company and customers will love its new products. Many in the tech community have taken this as a hint that Apple will finally unveil big-screen iPhones and iPads. And a recent report gives credence to this speculation.

Chinese technology website Digitimes, which has leaked Apple gadgets accurately in the past, has reported that the big-screen iPhone is scheduled for a May launch. This upcoming model will have a 20nm chipset made by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC).

It has long been rumoured that Apple is working on two big-screen iPhones – one with a 4.7-inch display and the other with a 6-inch panel.

The report also says that a big-screen iPad, with display sizes measuring 12.9-inch or 13.3-inch, will be unveiled in October next year. It is likely that Apple will pick the 12.9-inch screen size for final production; this falls in line with an earlier report that Apple will launch a 12.9-inch iPad Pro with 4K resolution in October.

Apple is working with Taiwan’s Quanta Computer to manufacture this upcoming tablet. This large-screen iPad will replace the 11-inch Macbook Air, says the report, citing sources.

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While 4K may make little sense on a tiny television screen, on a projector? Yes, please. Hearing these pleas is JVC, which has dropped not one but three consumer projectors with a 4K-like picture. Prices start at $4,999.

The three consumer models are the DLA-X900R ($11,999), the DLA-X700R ($7,999), and the DLA-X500R ($4,999), which include a new D-ILA device, 4K inputs, e-shift upscaling for 1080p-and-lower sources, and a user-selectable Intelligent Lens Aperture.

The projectors, which according to JVC aren’t technically 4K, use a system called “e-shift” which splits all incoming signals and spits them out to two 1080p panels. The image is then combined using “pixel shift” to emulate a 4K image.

JVC claims the Intelligent Lens Aperture produces deeper blacks while maintaining white levels and is “superior to what’s delivered by competing projectors using a dynamic iris”. The projectors feature an automated lens shift with memory presets for easier setup.

Of most interest is the entry-level DLA-X500R, which is the cheapest (pseudo) 4K projector we’ve seen so far, and half the expected price of the Sony 500ES. It features a 60,000:1 native contrast ratio thanks to a new Clear Black feature that provides local area contrast enhancement.

Pushing contrast levels even further are the DLA-X900R and DLA-X700R capable of 150,000:1 and 120,000:1 ratios, respectively.
The DLA-X900R and the DLA-X700R feature active 3D compatibility with THX 3D certification. The DLA-X900R ships with a 3D transmitter and two pairs of glasses.The new JVC D-ILA home theater projectors will be available November, and meanwhile the excellent 1080p DLA-X35 will stay in the range through 2014.

Samsung announced a new 98-inch model of its S9 line of Ultra HD TVs at the IFA electronics show on Thursday

Pushing to make the industry dream of 4K TVs a market reality, Samsung unveiled a mammoth new 98-inch S9 model on Thursday at the IFA electronics show and, perhaps more notably, an OLED prototype with the higher screen resolution.

TV makers, eager to find a new selling point for TVs now that flat panels are no longer a novelty, are hoping that quadrupling the number of pixels to the 4K range — 4,096×2,160 is one option — called Ultra HD or UHD. That’s a notable change, as long as you’re sitting close enough to your TV, but the OLED (organic light-emitting diode) shift is potentially bigger since it uses a higher-contrast technology with much deeper blacks than today’s LCD panels.

OLED has proved hard to bring to market, though, which is why it’s significant that Samsung showed the OLED UHD TV. It’s only a proof of concept, not a real product, but it indicates that the company is getting a grasp on manufacturing. It “demonstrates our technology leadership,” said Michael Zoeller, Samsung’s European marketing director for TV and audiovisual products.

The company said the technology “represents an unprecedented leap forward for picture quality and sharp contrast with its self-emitting pixels and natural motion,” but the real proof of its merits will come when somebody can buy it, and buy it in a large enough size that the 4K resolution isn’t just pixel overkill.

Closer to store shelves is the 55-inch Curved OLED, a TV with a conventional HD resolution of 1080p but an unconventional bowed shape. It’s already on sale in South Korea, but it costs more than $13,000.

“Ladies and gentlemen, the future is not flat,” Zoeller said. “Its curve makes the perceived size of the image larger,” and the OLED technology means “there is life in every pixel.”

In the 4K flat-panel realm, Samsung debuted its new 98-inch UHD screen. It’s a relative of the gargantuan 110-inch S9 TV unveiled at CES in January, but the 98-incher will presumably have a price between that top-end model and the smaller 85-inch alternative, the UN85S9.

Samsung also announced European pricing for two smaller UHD models, the 55-inch and 65-inch F9000 TVs, that cost 4,000 and 6,000 euros, respectively (that’s about $5,270 and $7,912 in U.S. currency). They’re now on sale.

Updated TVs are nice, but the news pales in comparison to Wednesday’s headline news from Samsung’s first press conference, the $300 Samsung Galaxy Gear, a smart watch that pairs with Samsung phones and comes with several apps.Also prominent was the announcement of the Galaxy Note 3 and the Galaxy Note 10.1, a stylus-equipped phablet and tablet, respectively.